Misery, Sugar and Movement

I have been overweight most of my adult life, but since changing my diet to gluten and dairy free pretty much all of that excess weight dropped away over a period of five years, and stayed off for a further seven. I worked to kick sugar too, and mostly succeeded, and more weight dropped off. But recently I’ve been eating more sugary foods (including carbohydrates and dried fruits, which are all sugar in one form or another) and have started to put some weight back on.

I always know that when I crave sweet things it means I am exhausted or feeling low for some reason and if not addressed, can lead to a mild form of depression. The trouble with eating sugar is that it gives you a lift and then drops you down even lower, so there is a cycle of feeling low, eating sugar, a moment of feeling OK then a crash back down to feeling low again. We can get into a cycle we think we can’t get out of and fall into despair. Continue reading “Misery, Sugar and Movement”

Girls and Contact Sports: What are We not Discussing?

Recently a wave of excitement rippled through many of the 9 to 12-year-old girls at the Primary School where I work. The girls were presented with the opportunity of participating in an exclusively all girl AFL* training programme during their lunch breaks – the latest example of the way in which girls are mixing it with the boys and claiming their apparent gender ‘equality.’

I could share neither in their excitement, nor in the vaunted claims of this being another positive step towards gender equity in sport. Rather, this for me marked a backward step.

Girls are now raised and educated to compete with the boys, and in this are laying down a foundation for a possible lifetime of competing with men on the terms dictated by a society that drives girls to toughen up and harden their bodies in exactly the same way as boys are exhorted to do – to the absolute detriment of their own emerging femininity. Continue reading “Girls and Contact Sports: What are We not Discussing?”

Letter to My Body

Photograph by Iris Pohl. “The body is the marker of all truth.” (Serge Benhayon)
Photograph by Iris Pohl. “The body is the marker of all truth.” (Serge Benhayon)

September the Nineteenth in the Year Two Thousand and Sixteen, London, United Kingdom

Dear Body,

There has been no other like you who has stuck with me through thick and thin, never to give up on me, yet ironically the very one I had used and abused like I would no other!

Who else would down those small or copious amounts of alcohol, a substance defined by our very own scientists as poison, and force it onto the liver, your sweet organ of harmony, whilst you patiently kept processing the killer substance? No other kind would do this. And yet we (I) call ourselves an intelligent species. Continue reading “Letter to My Body”

My Turnaround from Competitive Running to Connection with Me

During my late 20’s I took up competitive running. I joined a local running club and trained twice a week with the club, adding 3 or 4 sessions at home. Depending on what I was training for, I would run up to 60km per week.

I sometimes enjoyed my training but I always enjoyed when the weekends came and I could compete in races. I would enter races from 5km up to 50km and also hill races. Continue reading “My Turnaround from Competitive Running to Connection with Me”

Listening to Your Body – A New Body Corporate

If our bodies were a company we would be in all sorts of trouble!

Imagine a company that was trying to poison its staff. Imagine the global response if the company tried to tell the world that what they are giving staff is a treat for all the hard work they’ve put in, or that they are only poisoning people a little bit. Continue reading “Listening to Your Body – A New Body Corporate”

Alcohol is Not Normal

I grew up in a family with a lot of alcohol. A lot. My mother was and is an alcoholic, though to single her out as the only alcoholic is in fact the very first step in society’s clever and insidious avoidance of the whole picture.

An addict is defined as someone who is “…dependent on a substance and has formed a physical and/or psychological habit around that substance…

Which also exactly describes my father’s relationship with alcohol and all of his friends. Because they all ‘needed’ to drink pretty much every single day. And all did. They were all “…dependent on a substance and had formed a physical and/or psychological habit around that substance….” Continue reading “Alcohol is Not Normal”