Letter to My Body

Photograph by Iris Pohl. “The body is the marker of all truth.” (Serge Benhayon)
Photograph by Iris Pohl. “The body is the marker of all truth.” (Serge Benhayon)

September the Nineteenth in the Year Two Thousand and Sixteen, London, United Kingdom

Dear Body,

There has been no other like you who has stuck with me through thick and thin, never to give up on me, yet ironically the very one I had used and abused like I would no other!

Who else would down those small or copious amounts of alcohol, a substance defined by our very own scientists as poison, and force it onto the liver, your sweet organ of harmony, whilst you patiently kept processing the killer substance? No other kind would do this. And yet we (I) call ourselves an intelligent species. Continue reading “Letter to My Body”

Alcohol is Not Normal

I grew up in a family with a lot of alcohol. A lot. My mother was and is an alcoholic, though to single her out as the only alcoholic is in fact the very first step in society’s clever and insidious avoidance of the whole picture.

An addict is defined as someone who is “…dependent on a substance and has formed a physical and/or psychological habit around that substance…

Which also exactly describes my father’s relationship with alcohol and all of his friends. Because they all ‘needed’ to drink pretty much every single day. And all did. They were all “…dependent on a substance and had formed a physical and/or psychological habit around that substance….” Continue reading “Alcohol is Not Normal”

The Abuse of Alcohol – The True Harm

I recently read about a woman’s experience of alcoholism in her family detailing the abuse of alcohol and its ‘second-hand’ effects on her, and as I read I found my eyes darting as if not wanting to read and feel all that was being presented.

As I read the blog I could feel my own agony of living in a familiar feeling – my own household as a young boy would lurch from sunshine to violence through the use and continued abuse of alcohol. Even as I write this I can feel the questioning of that statement – it wasn’t every day, or every week – and this is how we can allow and not claim that even once is too much, and too many times.

Continue reading “The Abuse of Alcohol – The True Harm”

Alcohol: Cancer, ‘Safe’ Consumption and Choice

Recently I attended The Annual Women’s Health update forum held in Melbourne, March 2013, for doctors, nurses and allied health practitioners. Professor Ian Olver, CEO of Cancer Council Australia, shared his latest findings on alcohol and cancer. He presented evidence that alcohol consumption is a known cause of cancer and that:

  • the sites for these cancers are the mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, liver, female breast and colorectum,
  • cancer is increased because of the ethanol, regardless of the type of alcohol consumed, and
  • smoking and alcohol together are risk factors for 75% of head and neck cancers.

In summary, he stated there are no safe levels for alcohol consumption.  Continue reading “Alcohol: Cancer, ‘Safe’ Consumption and Choice”

Alcohol & My Kind of Friday Night

by Harry White, Gold Coast, Australia

My kind of Friday night is one that Saturday will thank me for.

There is a saying that, “The best nights are the ones that you don’t remember”. Well I have had one of those nights before, and if I didn’t remember it, my body certainly made sure that I did with the constant vomiting, headaches, stomach cramps and un-easiness.

Are those big party nights really worth it?

I mean, alcohol is expensive and it makes you do things that you will regret doing, like: Continue reading “Alcohol & My Kind of Friday Night”

A Little Bit of Alcohol seemed Safe Enough

by Gayle Cue, Bangalow NSW

I never really liked the taste of alcohol. However, it was part of being normal in society and so I tried. I wasn’t very successful at enjoying or abusing alcohol. Nonetheless, it has played a major role in my life.

My father had fought in the trenches of Germany during WWII. By the time he came back to the US, met my mother, and I was born, he was heavily into a relationship with alcohol, to try and drown out his memories and nightmares. My mother held off for several years while us kids were really young, but she eventually joined him in his misery and chosen relief.

I married at 18 to get out of the house. At the time I married my husband, he wasn’t truly an alcoholic – yet, but he was well on his way. His parents were also alcoholics so you can appreciate that it was difficult for us to see drinking as a problem. It was just part of life. I was still trying to be part of the norm and would try to drink, but I could never stomach more than one or two so rarely experienced being drunk, although I often experienced the headache and lethargic day that followed my attempts.  Continue reading “A Little Bit of Alcohol seemed Safe Enough”