“Serge Benhayon Said…”

How often in life have we used what another person said to validate our expression because we didn’t feel we were enough? We do it with anyone we perceive to be an authority because they have chosen to walk further than we have on some path of experience or other.

For example, a school child may say “the teacher said so”, or likewise invoke parental authority to convince another child of something they want another to accept. As adults we may say that such-and-such a scientist or doctor said something about health, or business expert said something about investment, or sporting hero said something about the physics of baseballs spinning, or priest said something about our ‘souls’, etc, etc.

We can come up with as many examples as there are realms of activity in life. In each case we validate ourselves by using the words or ways of someone we perceive as more credible than ourselves.

It may be true that in a purely worldly sense we don’t have expertise in those various fields because we haven’t put the same effort and focus into them that another person has; and that is the only difference. And so, in my view, to fly those people like a flag instead of using our own authority, propping up our lack of self-worth and filling in for our fearful reluctance to express what we do actually know, is not a true approach.

It’s fine to put forth the possibility that what someone else said is worth looking at and may be gobsmackingly, world-changingly true, as long as we are the ‘marker of truth’ ourselves – we are speaking from the fullness of our self-love and confidence and what feels true to us regardless of who said what.

When it comes to what Serge Benhayon shares (undeniably very shareable!) with the students of Universal Medicine and The Way of The Livingness, I’ve seen people come out with “Serge Benhayon said” spoken with reverence of the truth but not yet of their own deeply felt and known truth.

Serge Benhayon
Serge Benhayon | Founder of Universal Medicine

And I have seen quite the opposite, in a couple of different flavours. One is avoiding quoting Serge in order to avoid being perceived as someone lacking confidence who uses their ‘authority figure’ to prop up their power in an interaction. Another is criticising and rejecting what Serge has said because of the discomfort of having to accept the possibility that it might be true, and not wanting to show that this truth and discomfort are being recognised.

In each of these situations, Serge is being used as a football in a game of personal issues, even being “shot as the messenger.” It is pretty abusive to do that to another human. Serge Benhayon is a great person, offering his own wisdom and experience for us to take up or leave as suits us, and does not deserve the role of a football or bullet-riddled messenger!

I confess to having suffered ‘cringe factor’ sometimes when I heard someone say: “Serge Benhayon said….,” and I had to go deeply into what was going on there. I realised the cringe was in response to the energy behind why the person was saying it – the energy behind what I described earlier about not expressing from the truth within oneself but vicariously from another’s.

Once upon a time some of Serge’s words stuck in the craw of my ‘outer reductionist scientist’ self. But at the same time I could feel those words resonating with the inner-me that knows science in a much more expansive way.

Reductionist science, if done truthfully and for the right reasons (instead of propagating scientific belief and excluding everything else), has some usefulness in the modern world. Something like: “If I don’t understand a system, test it, cut it up and see what it’s made of, then imagine it back together, calculate what should happen, observe what does happen in intact, examples of it, and see if our ideas about it still hold true.” I say “imagine it back together because it’s hard to actually re-construct a functional rat brain once you’ve serial-sectioned it or an atom once you’ve blown it to bits! You can see the limitation… and that’s where our innermost, expansive scientific selves come in.

Once upon a time the part of me that had not let go of the ‘belief’ aspect of reductionist science was a bit rattled by some of the things Serge Benhayon said. But over the years as my own inner wisdom and sense of truth have grown, the things Serge says have gone from ‘rattling’ to ‘hypothesis’ to “darn, that guy’s right again!”

I have come to the point of listening carefully to everything he has to say, and anything that doesn’t jump into my yes-zone immediately gets filed under “good possibility to check out, probably will turn out true if so far is any indication.” Then I test it in my own life. So far, the results have been: “Darn, that guy’s right about everything!” Or at least 99.9% – gotta allow some margin for imperfection in human life!

So if you ever hear me say “Serge Benhayon said…”, it won’t be from a belief just because Serge said it, and it won’t be from needing an authority to fill a lack of self-worth or gain power in an interaction. It will be from a scientific understanding that when a presented truth continues to prove true with time and testing, you can use it as a good foundation upon which to conduct your experiments and your life affairs. It certainly saves a lot of time and failures!

Dianne Trussell
Dianne Trussell

However, I fully embrace the importance of living every moment in the awareness of what we feel and know truly within, not just making assumptions and going along in momentum. And when I say truly, I mean truly, because we do tend to go through life with a lot of habits of knowing and feeling that are not from truth when deeply examined.

It’s important to always ensure that we feel and check the deepest innermost truth for ourselves to avoid complacency and propagation of errors, and to keep up with energetic shifts as each of us, and the whole system we’re part of, evolves.

Then when we quote another person who inspires us like Serge Benhayon, it is a confirmation of a shared truth for all.

Inspired by the blog: Relationships: It’s Now About What I Feel, Not What Serge Benhayon Says

By Dianne Trussell | Bachelor of Science, Honours – majors: Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Chemistry & Psychology | 17 years experience in medical and biological university research (primarily neuroscience and cell biology) | co-author of 12 peer-reviewed publications in scientific journals

Further Reading:
About Serge Benhayon
Meeting Serge Benhayon – A Meeting on the Edge of Eternity

709 thoughts on ““Serge Benhayon Said…”

  1. When quoting another we don’t have the space to share our own relationship, experience and authority on a subject. Which can reflect our relationship with ourselves, do we value what we can share from our own life?

  2. If we come from lack of self worth, invoking an ‘authority’ may help us to make a point, but does not help us to deal with our lack of self worth, which is what really matters.

  3. I have found myself cringing at times when people have said “Serge said’ or ‘Natalie said’, as if to to make what they are saying right or true or to make a point. It is in the energy in which we speak not what we speak that counts and as we become more aware and able to discern the quality of our energy whether we be speaker or listener we are able to recognise the truth. It is also our responsibility to call each other out in the most loving way we know how.

  4. “So and so said…” is such a crafty position. We can use it to hide behind and shield ourselves from possible attack while our connection to the truth is untapped, only to pop our head out when we feel safer to hold up the statement as our belief. Yep, I have used it too and it leaves me feel powerless and disconnected.

  5. It is a bit absurd in the case of Serge to say “Serge said” because I have observed that Serge almost never says the same thing twice. In any event if he shares something and someone asks him to repeat it, he will share it again differently the second time, therefore Serge himself never says what he said!!!

  6. Two people can say EXACTLY the same words and they will have a very different meaning. It is not just about the words but the energy they are expressed in. We all know people who smile and say nice things but really they are seething with anger. Therefore you simply can’t repeat what someone says in the way they said it unless you are vibrating in exactly the energy with which they said it, and that is not possible because by the time you repeat it the universe has moved on.

    1. Furthermore, the chances are that most people when repeating even get the words wrong so when someone says Serge said you can almost guarantee it does not convey what Serge may or may not have expressed but says more about them. What you can do as you say Dianne, is share your own experience including your experience of inspiration from Serge if that is the case.

  7. Ah Dianne, what an amazing blog. Many people would not feel comfortable to admit what you have shared here – the fact that we use an authority to back up our claims because of a lack of trust in what we’re saying.

  8. It’s interesting what you present here Dianne and I can feel a level of restraint comes into the equation in that sometimes we tend to quote others or repeat what others have said so we don’t actually have to take responsibility for and be in the authority of what is being said ourselves.

  9. I cannot understand why it is that Serge Benhayon is being so misrepresented, I have been to many workshops and presentations over the years I have known about him and I agree with you Dianne in that he is offering his own wisdom for us all to take or leave as we please. It’s as simple as that.

  10. I love what you have presented here. When I hear myself quoting someone else, I know that I have not embodied or lived that practice or concept enough to express it from my body. I am glad that now I notice when I do this and it doesn’t carry my own lived quality, as it alerts me to something I can develop in my life.

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