Imperfect

per·fec·tion / pərˈfekSH(ə)n/  the condition, state, or quality of being free or as free as possible from all flaws or defects.

The idea of being perfect once offered me something finite – a finish, closure, an end. It was something I could strive for and achieve. An expected goal. It was an old familiar feeling and very comfortable, however it was a form of imprisonment.

Freedom from flaws was a hard task, restrictive and near impossible. It was like the Geisha, living a life of controlled gestures, highly skilled and pleasing others.

Striving for perfection is demanding, exhausting and all consuming: driven by an external force of never feeling enough and always keeping it together.

But what if there is no perfection in life and nature – only cycles? Cycles impulse around and around, they are naturally and forevermore expanding and evolving, there is no end to these cycles. There is no stagnation, only change.

Can we measure perfection? Being perfect at a task, by the way we look, by what we do, say or think?

Perhaps we cannot measure perfection because we are forever evolving? This means that there must be change in everything we think, do and express. We are forever expanding and can always go deeper… in our conversations, our movements, in our connection with self.

What if our expression in life will never be perfect and nor should it be; perhaps being perfect is just a concept we have hung onto, thinking that in some way it made us ‘better’ or more lovable.

In the past, believing the idea of perfection pushed me to improve, achieve, to try, and to separate from my natural flow and beauty as a woman. In choosing to try to be perfect it often took me so far away from myself that I felt disconnected from life and my inner feelings.

Being a perfectionist felt like I had no sense of humour; it felt like wearing a suit of armour and having tightly bound feet, restrictive and joyless. It was seemingly protecting me from the hurts of the world, but really it blocked the love within me from expressing outwards.

Perfectionism held me back from being my gorgeous, playful, fluid and powerful self. In many ways trying to be perfect has prevented me from truly connecting with others, never allowing myself to feel unravelled, exposed and free to walk my own path. I have been lost in the illusion that ‘I am only worthy of love if I am perfect’. This simply is not true.

The truth is that I am not perfect and deep within me is a knowing that this is okay… as there is no such thing as perfection.

Imperfection is real, fresh, sexy and alive in its fullness and is ever-changing.

I no longer choose to be a perfectionist. I am unwinding the tightly bound beliefs of this imposition. I am slipping out of the corset and straitjacket of glamour and unhinging the ‘love blocking’ suit of armour. I have removed the facade and taken off the mask. Every day I feel more light and lovely – I am now enjoying appreciating myself without the need to be perfect.

In fact, I feel the true beauty within me that is strong, still, powerful and forever evolving. I now know who I am. I am an extraordinarily beautiful Woman just being myself, and there is no room for perfection in that. I am worthy of the deep love that flows from within me and is expressed out to the world every single day. I celebrate this love and appreciate all that I am without perfection.

Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment, movement and magic in every moment. It has its own Divine order and greater plan, in which I now trust. I am imperfectly perfect.

I am deeply and forevermore inspired by the teachings of Serge Benhayon, Natalie Benhayon, Universal Medicine and The Ageless Wisdom.

By Kathryn Fortuna, Inner Image Consultant

Further reading:
Accepting Your Imperfections and Grandness
Whoops Is One Of My Favourite Words – A Message From the Author

 

1,022 thoughts on “Imperfect

  1. ‘Perfectionism held me back from being my gorgeous, playful, fluid and powerful self.’ – So true Kathryn and something I can relate to in my life. It is quite exhausting trying to live up to some ‘perfect’ picture, you never really get anywhere because you always end up creating more ideals and beliefs to live up to anyway. I am learning to let go of this pattern in my life and to be more honouring and appreciative of all the qualities I bring and your blog is a beautiful reminder of the power and joy we feel when we stop the perfectionism in our lives.

    1. I can totally relate to this also Anna…. In my experience, being a perfectionist is not only stressful and exhausting, but also erodes self-worth because anything less than perfection can leave us never feeling good enough… And then when we feel ‘less’ as a result, we try to do ‘more’ to make up for the ‘less’ which just keeps this pattern in momentum…. It may be sustainable for a while but when there is eventually nothing to be perfect about, we can end up feeling lost or that we’ve failed. Making different choices and working on accepting imperfection and focussing on who I ‘am’, not what I ‘do’ has been a huge shift for me and one I can only say I’d highly recommend!

      1. Hi Angela & Anna
        This feeling LESS therefore doing MORE phenomenon is worldwide. In fact Gosh the world is propelled by this sort of activity. No wonder we are all exhausted.

    2. I agree Anna, perfectionism is an ideal impossible to achieve, and the striving for perfection instantly shuts down our natural true way of expressing – so we lose joy of living in each moment just as we are.

    3. I agree Anna, perfectionism is most definitely a trap which has us striving for an unobtainable ideal and belief, because when we have a sense we have done something near perfect it is my experience that the goal posts are changed and a new picture is formed to tell us there must be more, a better way or faster. It’s an illusion we play with wanting to believe that we are achieving and bettering ourselves, but in actual fact we are keeping ourselves down – feeding our lack of self worth.

    4. I agree, Kathryn’s blog is a beautiful reminder of the power and joy we feel when we let go of perfectionism and actually appreciate ourselves for the natural beauty we bring to everything we do when we are connected to who we truly are and not living from ideals and beliefs that shaped us from young.

    5. Yes Anna, as I was reading this blog a lovely smile kept creeping up over my face because it’s so true and insightful on what Kathryn was sharing and so so freeing. Perfectionism does so hold us back from being our gorgeous playful fluid and powerful self. I, like many other commenters here, are learning to let go of the shackles of perfection and get jiggy with the sexiness realness delightfulness that allowing imperfection brings.

  2. When we are connected to our sacredness, our stillness, no judging thoughts come, they just cannot enter because there is not one part of us that can align to that, its just not possible.

      1. How simple and yet profoundly powerful is this fact ‘When we are connected to our sacredness we are full of love and there is not room for judgement in that!’ No room for judgement and I would add not room for self judgement as well as judgement of others.

    1. Beautifully said Julie, and when l try to be perfect l see you as less than me or someone l need to compete with to be better than.
      It’s a breeding ground for separation.

    2. Beautiful Julie, if we start first from that connection then we can see and understand what is before us, and in that there can be no judgement.

      1. What a great reminder Annie – approaching life and everything we do -always from the starting point of connection with ourselves, – and then when we observe that we have started to strive for perfection, it can simply be a marker that we have not made that connection!

  3. Perfectionism is a form of control. Trying to control yourself and the response you get back from other people and life in order not to get hurt. Embracing being ‘imperfect’ is so freeing – You free yourself up to be a true student of life and embrace the lessons that come to you. It also leaves greater space to love yourself for exactly who you are.

    1. Spot on Kathryn! In my experience I’ve definitely experienced perfectionism as a form of control. I used to think that attention to detail and perfection were synonymous, however what I am learning to appreciate is that I can have an attention to detail which comes from the care I have for myself and others and that this is totally different that comes from the perfection that is driven by needing to control – self and others.

      1. That’s beautiful Angela, I have noticed this difference too, I could pay attention to every detail as a way of trying to be perfect and thus out of control ( because I did not want to be judged as less when everything is not in order). Nowadays, it is out of the care for myself and all the people that I love, to pay attention to detail and that is never overdoing it but a lovely flow to be in and has its ripple effect to everyone because the love is felt.

  4. Kathryn – I love the awareness and exposure you bring to rattle this old cage of perfectionism and see the lies it perpetuates. It is inspiring to read of you re-claiming the fiery and and gorgeous you.
    “Perfectionism held me back from being my gorgeous, playful, fluid and powerful self. In many ways trying to be perfect has prevented me from truly connecting with others, never allowing myself to feel unravelled, exposed and free to walk my own path. I have been lost in the illusion that ‘I am only worthy of love if I am perfect’. This simply is not true”.

    1. I agree Steve, mistakes are just an opportunity for learning, so reacting and self-criticism only sabotage the gift of learning that moment has brought.

    2. ‘With perfection you learn nothing’ beautifully expressed Steve. One of the joys of life is appreciating our ‘whoops’ moments, being able to laugh at ourselves when we get it wrong and going deeper to connect to the learning. Without this we are standing still and life is very dull.

  5. Kathryn your description of perfection as the Geisha is priceless….”living a life of controlled gestures, highly skilled and pleasing others”.
    It doesn’t feel like there is much room for joy or fun in a life lived like this.

  6. Perfection to me is how our bodies and the earth function. They are constantly making perfect choices as to what the situation is. ‘Perfection’ is never achieved but the system is perfect. If we feel what is going on we can also make the ‘perfect’ choice in any situation. Thank you Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine for supporting me in so many ways.

  7. ‘It was seemingly protecting me from the hurts of the world, but really it blocked the love within me from expressing outwards.’ This I have experienced everyday – this feeling of not quite being enough, not quite made the grade – it feels heavy and debilitating. And like the armour it represents, perfectionism prevents us from shining ever so naturally out into the world who we are. I am not perfect – I am love. I am not perfect – I am evolving. I am not perfect – but the part I play fits with all others. I am not perfect – I am me.

    1. Beautiful Lee. Reading this I can feel what a theatre perfectionism is an indulgent game that I use to hold back while I tell myself I am ‘trying to be more’.

  8. Perfection is a stifling cage – when living to perfection life becomes hard work, drab, void of sparkle, and living in the moment.

  9. This is a blog I love re-reading. Each time I do I feel another piece of the chain that’s held me in the imprisonment of perfection come off, bit by bit.. Beliefs around having to be perfect can run deep and they have a purpose– to undo us, to cut ourselves down from living and accepting the beauty we so naturally are. I love your glorious claiming Kathryn — ‘I am perfectly imperfect.’ Stunning.

  10. “Perhaps we cannot measure perfection because we are forever evolving?”. This is great because it breaks down that ideal that somehow we reach an end point where everything is “perfect”. The whole idea of perfection is a set up that prevents us for loving and accepting ourselves in any given moment.

  11. I love inviting friends home but in the past I always ended up exhausted before they even crossed the threshold. I had to think of everything, to the finest detail like sliced lemon in the cold water, the best plate to put the food on…. Having friends still means work but with far less anxiety. I no longer try to impress with my organisational skills. And I accept their help with pleasure. Perfectionism may not be totally out of my life yet, it is a persistent pest, but its days are numbered.

    1. I absolutely relate to what you share here Patricia. I have done this many times myself. In fact I remember throwing a party after months of planning and being so stressed on the day I was picking fights (even though everything was ‘perfect’). On that day I realised that what I really wanted was connection with others, not the perfect shebang.

    2. I love this Patricia, perfectionism being a persistent pest but one whose days are numbered! It can take some time to break our long held beliefs about how things should be and relax into a way of life that is simply by its divine nature. Simplicity is like the dissolver of perfectionism.

  12. What a wonderful sharing Kathryn ! I have been caught in the false ideal of perfectionism in my life and I too see it in the young lives of small children through to the elderly.
    Children suffer because their Parents are also caught in the trap too and they themselves don’t have the skills to get out so how can they help their young? For us to spread the word on the impossible need for Perfection can only help us all in the end become more appreciative of self and each other and enjoy our lives in all their joyous imperfections.

  13. Perfectionism to me seems to be just another way we set ourselves up to not feel good enough about ourselves, especially as the ideal keeps changing – so even if we did do something perfectly, we then change the marker to not be perfect. The perfect set up.

  14. ‘Imperfection is real, fresh, sexy and alive in its fullness and is ever-changing’. Wow! There’s true energy in these words and so refreshing. They destroy long held beliefs of perfection, If only I had this as my template from childhood, how different I would have been in life.

  15. Evolution and cycles feel so expansive and limitless while perfection feels restrictive and suffocating. How strange that I have spent so long striving for something I don’t want. A craving for love has always been underneath my hunger for perfection and I can see I lose sight of this when I go into ‘perfection mode’.

    1. I agree Leonne trying to be perfect actually is ‘A craving for love’. It is like shouting ‘See me, see me’ not recognising that we are so protected and so not ourselves that it’s not easy for anyone to see who we are. It is a horrible game we play to not accept and play down the grandness we already are.

      1. What a great description of perfectionism Annelies. I can feel there is real desperation in perfectionism and it makes perfect sense that it is simply a craving for love. I have come to realise that the love I crave cannot be found outside of me and this makes striving for perfection seem ridiculous.

      2. Striving for perfection is ridiculous Leonne! The choices our race have made are completely ridiculous. A whole planet of essentially deeply beautiful, funny, intelligent , loving beings, running around adopting ridiculous ways of behaving, to get the love we crave, when all the treasure of heaven above and earth below resides within our innermost hearts!

  16. Beautifully expressed Kathryn, “Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment, movement and magic in every moment.” From this knowing we allow the freedom and openness to forever expand and evolve within the interconnectedness and divine order of the universe.

  17. A beautiful way to start the day Kathryn. Striving for perfection does not allow for the natural flow of love and our own evolution as you have so divinely observed. Letting go of perfection is like being released from a self-imposed prison and frees us to express the truth of who we are in every moment without restraint.

  18. Reading today Kathryn I am touched by how you say “We are forever expanding and can always go deeper”. Whilst this could seem like a quest for some holy grail, today I can feel its not that at all, but just an allowing out of what we already are to live in harmony with all these cycles. The only perfection that is real is the way we are held continuously in this loving arrangement, learning we already are everything we ever need to be.

    1. Yes Joseph the only perfection is the way we are held in these divine cycles. When I truly connect to this I am able to simply let go and trust that all is unfolding as it should. 🙂

  19. There is no perfection because we are forever evolving. That is such a liberating perspective. Then it is just about evolving and learning. Life becomes light and playful, as in playing there is neither perfection. Ha, ha, anybody ever heard as a child to play perfect?

  20. Such a gorgeous blog to re-visit and be reminded of your wise words Kathryn – ‘Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment, movement and magic in every moment. It has its own Divine order and greater plan, in which I now trust. I am imperfectly perfect.’ – Such perfect timing for me to read this thank you.

    1. Anna, I am starting to grasp (and accept joyfully) I am part of this Divine order and greater plan, and this is giving me the true confidence I could never imagine I would have.It is a feeling of flow and naturalness in my body which feels exquisite.

  21. “But what if there is no perfection in life and nature – only cycles?” I love this Kathryn! Cycles are a beautiful unfoldment for our lives. We are forever learning and evolving when we are ready.

  22. ‘Cycles impulse around and around, they are naturally and forevermore expanding and evolving, there is no end to these cycles. There is no stagnation, only change.’ If I look at society it seems only to be based on perfection, we have to strive to get our goal and then we are setting the next goal and so on and so on. A forever exhausting experience, and it is creating a lot of emotions too. Living with cycles feels natural but I still can caught up in setting a goal and trying the perfection mode but my body is clearly showing that is not the way. I loose my connection and feeling of expansion and frustration and tightness (old and not so good friends) are back in town. So Kathryn, I am with you on ‘Imperfection is real, fresh, sexy and alive in its fullness and is ever-changing’.

  23. “I am an extraordinarily beautiful Woman just being myself, and there is no room for perfection in that” this is so true, in being ourself is no space for perfection, as I have experienced perfectionism is only holding me back, to try to live up to the ideals of something that in truth is not me. As in core we are not perfect, we are always learning, which in truth is the beauty of life.

  24. Thank you Kathryn, for a truly beautiful blog, I have been held most of my life in the armour of the “good and right ” , I have not used the word perfection but this is similar, tightly bound and joyless was my experience also. I am now casting off the armour and allowing myself to make mistakes and not beat myself up, and joy and playfulness are starting to enter my life. I just love these words. “Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment, movement and magic in every moment. It has its own Divine order and greater plan, in which I now trust. I am imperfectly perfect.”

  25. .Thank you for sharing your awesome blog.
    We are not meant to be perfect. So true…yet society, still puts so much pressure on themselves, to get it right, or to know it all and when they don’t, they make themselves less, which creates self- worth issues. This has been work in progress for me. I am learning it is okay, to ask for support where needed. I don’t have to know it all. It is okay for us all to have our whoops moments, this I am learning…… Embracing my imperfections. I now know, in essence we are all the same, but each of us, has our very own expression. With all these different expressions we have, we can support each other to do, what is needed in this world…. true brotherhood. Get to know our strengths and our imperfections and fully embrace them.

  26. ‘We are forever expanding and can always go deeper … in our conversations, our movements, in our connection with self.’ What I can feel as I read this is how there is a fear/restriction that I hold around this – a trepidation of “What will come up if I do?” However to stunt the awareness and to try and put the brakes on expanding feels vey limiting and un-evolutionary and is in fact very controlling. This is what we are doing when we try to be perfect.

  27. ‘Striving for perfection is demanding, exhausting and all consuming: driven by an external force of never feeling enough and always keeping it together.’ With this we ask for recognition and this has no end if we try to be perfect, the ‘trying’ it says it all, we will never get there.

  28. Perfectionism will never allow us to appreciate in full as there is always another goal to reach and to strive for.
    Something I am developing to live is a rhythm of confirming and appreciating myself and this is opening up a space in myself to be perfectly imperfect and imperfectly perfect.

  29. ‘Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment’. A great line that speaks volumes. If we were all perfect there would be no evolution.

  30. Not only do all of our imperfections help us grow and develop as a person but it’s also our imperfections that actually make us human….

  31. I am glad you wrote about perfection Kathryn. As I am reading about perfection I can feel how my lack of self esteem and worth played out in having perfection with in my home . I felt exhausted and unfulfilled and not validated. It did feel restricted and joyless and with out connection, but dutiful and frustrated.

  32. It really is wonderful to read about imperfection. As soon as I started reading it the kookaburras started laughing… It is so against what every one is striving for… The constant reaching for the unobtainable, and it can go on for a whole lifetime.

  33. ‘Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment, movement and magic in every moment. It has its own Divine order and greater plan, in which I now trust. I am imperfectly perfect.’ If I read this I felt how flat and dull perfection is, how serious we need to be and how we don’t allow any magic in our lives to come through, a narrow path to walk on and we are so afraid to fall off. How different to how imperfection feels, how it allows to connect to our power. That’s what your blog feels like to me Kathryn, very powerful!

  34. “What if our expression in life will never be perfect and nor should it be; perhaps being perfect is just a concept we have hung onto, thinking that in some way it made us ‘better’ or more lovable.” I love what you wrote Kathryn as perfection feels like a prison which most of us are living in. Perfection holds us be like puppets keeping us unaware so each move becomes not our own move. It is really time to debunk perfection for what it is – a deceiver.

  35. The beauty of our imperfections belies us all as it is the honesty and realness shared from our soul. We can learn so much from the honesty of our imperfections and its rawness. We are not perfectly built machines but people with unique qualities and nuances, forever evolving and learning from one another.

  36. Kathryn your following question is for me the best question ever: “Perhaps we cannot measure perfection because we are forever evolving?” Living a life with knowing that we are forever evolving means there is no stagnation or an end hence there is no time for perfection.

  37. ‘This means that there must be change in everything we think, do and express’ this is so true and being caught up in perfection I have never viewed life this way, that life is constantly fluid, changing and evolving so how can anything ever be perfect as there are no end points only moments to appreciate within a cycle.

  38. ‘Imperfection allows growth and unfoldment movement and magic’, I can feel how restrictive it is to focus on finding perfection as by doing so we miss out on allowing the magic to unfold.

  39. Working in the design industry I can easily get bogged down by perfection, the perfect colour or getting something just right but by doing so I can feel how suffocating and frustrating this is as it is so often the so called accidental results that end up being the strongest designs.

  40. Many of us fall for the illusion that we have to be perfect to be worthy of love, either from ourselves or from another. There is a high price to pay for perfectionism, it not only kills our creativity but robs us the learning we could receive when we make a mistake.

  41. ‘Freedom from flaws was a hard task, restrictive and near impossible. It was like the Geisha, living a life of controlled gestures, highly skilled and pleasing others.’ What a prison we have made with the geisha tradition. But just about everything is structured in a similar way! Freedom comes from being who we really are, flaws and all, and perfectionism is a construct that just doesn’t work.

  42. It’s true Kathryn when we strive for perfection there is never any closure for we are never satisfied, it is never enough.

  43. ‘Imperfection is real, fresh, sexy and alive in its fullness and is ever-changing’. These are wise words Kathryn that completely takes away the oppressive and rigid pressure of perfectionism to allow the awareness and understanding that our imperfections are merely a gift and opportunity to learn and evolve.

  44. Kathryn, I love what you have presented and it’s really supportive to read this right now, to know the trap we create for ourselves with perfection and for me to see that my quest to be perfect came not just from wanting to be loved but wanting to be safe and secure; I understood love to be that safety in fact and saw it as only available if I deserved, or was ‘perfect’ in some way. But it’s a trap and a forever loop of seeking and trying and the biggest trick is that it’s not possible to be perfect here, and we are all lovable as we are, deserving of that love because no matter what we do, underneath in all of us is an essence that is love.

  45. If we accept that evil means anything that separates us from who we truly are, that is our soul, we can say that the pursuit of perfection is evil because that is the end result of striving for perfection. There is no perfection whilst we are in the physical form.

  46. What is so attractive in the idea of there being ‘perfection’ is that that signals a point where we can wash our hands of whatever we have been involved in up to that point, and relax ever after. Perfectionism fights against the fact that we live in cycles and we are forever evolving, expanding and that we are all the ones that create the Oneness – no wonder it’s so exhausting.

  47. Perfectionism certainly feels like a straight-jacket and to me the more it is struggled with the tighter the jacket becomes. It is a big thing to learn to allow oneself to be perfectly imperfect.

  48. Perfectionism seems to be the opposite of appreciation, I know for me perfectionism thrived until I began to fill my awareness with my many beautiful qualities through self appreciation. Trying to be perfect held less and less appeal as I began to take delight in all of who I am. Perfectionism is such an illusion, yet it definitely can have a very powerful and destructive hold on us.

  49. We create these ‘prisons of perfection’ fashioned from the many ideals we subscribe to in order to keep us small and safe, lest we let go and feel the true majesty we are.

  50. I have come to the realisation that it is such a trap to think that one day you will get somewhere and that will be it, and that when you actually stop and consider the fact that we can always grow, learn, expand and evolve, you realise what a true gift that really is!

  51. The consciousness of ‘perfection’ what this falsely means in our society is what we have to date been driven by. To achieve this state of ‘perfection’ by shaping ourselves on images from an outside world, as otherwise we are considered less, is an unattainable state as the images are never fixed and always changing. But what if there was a true perfection that it is a quality, a state of being-ness that emanates from the union of our body and Soul, a quality that consistently calls us to be All that we Divinely are, and anything less that this is imperfect, flawed and corrupted? As in this state of being, in union with God we are truly free from the conditions of creation that solely aim to hold us as less, reduced, and contracted from living All that we truly and actually are.

  52. A perfect exposure of perfectionism. With imperfection “there is no stagnation, only change” this really resonated with me as if we seek perfection it becomes and end in itself and we can stagnate but if we embrace imperfection there is a constant awareness that there is more.

  53. I love what you have written here, exposing perfection. That there is actually no such thing as perfection as we always evolve and, that what might have been perfect in this moment is already asked to be expanding in the next. That life is a continuous flow of expansion and thus there is no end, no stopping point.

  54. I am sure I often write this but the only way to be is perfectly imperfect 🙂 it is freedom to be ourselves to ‘be’ with everything we do. I had no idea what this felt like ’till I booted perfection out of my repertoire.

  55. Perfectionism is the biggest trap, one I lived caught in for many years. Everything you share here Kathryn I can relate to. What I found challenging in stepping out of it was to feel how so very vulnerable I felt when I began to let it go. I had become my way of “keeping it all together” in life. Yet in truth, I had nothing together, just a lot of doubt and self judgement. Trust has changed this for me, what do I trust,
    the, steadiness that I am within. This completely laughs at perfectionism.

  56. Striving for perfection has been such a trap for me, a complete distraction and ultimately unobtainable and so therefore I would often feel paralysed from starting something knowing I could never do it perfectly. The freedom and joy that comes from allowing releases the control and embracing the understanding that there is always support, if we are open to receiving it, has transformed my life. Perfectionism can seem like a responsible way to live but for me it certainly meant I was avoiding life and thus responsibility. Accepting and appreciating that I am doing the best I can feels more responsible and I get way more done than when I was trying to control everything around me to get the ‘perfect’ outcome.

  57. I too have lived in the ‘perfection’ camp, it isn’t a very loving or supportive place to be, in fact it is quite the opposite. It is a place where you are forever second guessing yourself, always self judgemental, condemning oneself also. What I have learned is that when you are always operating in this space, you are never allowing the glory of the real you to enter, if you are allowing whatever comes into your mind to be the truth, listening to it, believing it, then it will always win. But if you learn to throw out the criticism, the moment it comes in, letting them go, telling them to go, this then creates the space for more love and appreciation to come in.

  58. Ah reading this one again is such a good reminder. I know I have written it before but really there is only one kind of perfect to be and that is perfectly imperfect. Anything else is just – as you say – a straight jacket.

  59. What I’ve realised reading this again is perfectionism belongs to the world of form, to the physical world. So long as I still identify with that and not my being, which is completely formless, then perfectionism can still hook me. I can still buy into pictures of how I or life need to be. As I write I feel my being, and it’s completely indescribable. How could something beyond this world and its concepts even be related to perfectionism? It’s truly a revelation just to feel this. I can see that this world is about the degradation of all that is pure, sacred and true, it’s a focus on the physical and not the being, and that evolution is a continual elevation back to the being we truly are.

  60. What a great blog this is to re-visit Kathryn – thankfully, perfectionism is impossible and instead of making us more lovable, it does the exact opposite as we get more demanding of others to be more perfect too. A horrible way to live and it is great to expose it for the prison it is to support letting go of the stranglehold it can have upon us..
    “What if our expression in life will never be perfect and nor should it be; perhaps being perfect is just a concept we have hung onto, thinking that in some way it made us ‘better’ or more lovable”.

  61. I am well aware how imperfect I am and are reminded of that fact every day. But the suggestion that there is perfection in our cycles makes absolute sense to me as I am very aware when I have a repeated lesson or a repeated reminder of one of my imperfections come up and I ignore it, they definitely come back again and again until I learn to heal and let it go.

  62. There is perfection; yet it is divine and does not belong to human beings. Moreover, when humans play with this idea is always to highlight that there are some things or people that are better than others. It is always tainted by comparison or competition. The ‘perfect’ prison.

  63. “But what if there is no perfection in life and nature – only cycles? ” I love this Kathryn. Witnessing the seasons changing – trees and flowers blooming and falling – there is a beauty in every aspect. Trying to ‘get it right’ as a human has resulted in a hardness and lack of joy – and of course no perfect result. . Nature is a great teacher – allowing what is to be to unfold and to just be.

  64. I love your blog Kathryn, totally dismantling the locks and bars that imprisons us from the illusion of having to be perfect. Beautifully expressed and hugely inspiring. When we embrace letting go of trying to be perfect we can instantly feel a sense of expansion, lightness and playfulness.

  65. Placing myself on a pedestal never worked but understanding the balance in life that has led me to the understanding that all I do is to the best of my ability is so empowering. This last statement takes the guessing game out of life and also takes away, right and wrong, good and bad, by introducing mistakes as part of our evolution. Thank you Kathryn for sharing about im-perfection.

  66. It is so true that in striving to be perfect and to be something that we are not, we are taking ourselves away from who we innately are and our ability to appreciate ourselves and all we can offer. How gorgeous to expose and let go of such an imposition.

  67. The concept of flaws or defects actually sounds weird. What are they and who says a flaw is a flaw or a defect is a defect? Who’s standards are we trying to meet? To me, perfection is all about imagery and when something does not match the image one has of someone or something.

  68. Beautiful Katie.
    I am always interested about how for example we know that perfection is not existing on this plane earth, yet we keep going and going for that. What I got to feel, having had this subject quite present in my life, that this is simply a distraction away of who we are. That it is another way of escaping the oh so scared feeling of letting go of all we have created and giving us over, surrendering us back to the source of Soul (were we come from). Hence it makes a lot of sense that with our current intelligence and present knowledge we still choose and do the things we do that are seemingly not working. So it is just a matter of seeing that and being willing to change.

  69. Here it is – God’s genius in perfect imperfection. When we look to the world, humanity, our own individual life and its details – it’s far from perfect, yet there’s an order we can feel that is holding us all and that imperfection makes perfect sense in the scope of our evolution/expansion.

  70. When I am striving for perfection I know that I have left me in order to achieve recognition and acceptance.

  71. As I was reading this blog, I realised my idea of perfection was based on my perceived idea of what others would consider ‘perfect’. Therefore it has no basis in reality and really only comes from my own beliefs and interpretation of past events. It is quite elusive like shifting sands and leaves me feeling unsteady and unsure. Accepting I am not perfect and I cant possibly know or meet what everyone in the world would expect of me, creates a lot of space and ease in my body. It seems imperfection is definitely something to embrace.

  72. This is so true Kathryn. I am realising that there is no such thing as being perfect or in perfection because we are all part of the universe and the universe is forever expanding. The concept of perfection is created to suppress our evolution so we think we have or can reach a place of perfection and that is it. So, striving for perfection is like putting our breaks on our evolution and pretty much going against the flow of the universe.

  73. One of the greatest keys to being able to embody forth a divine life on earth is to know that there is no perfection on this plane. We are all imperfect, and yet we are originally and truly divine and from another harmonious plane of life. When we live from this true divine brotherhood we understand about imperfection and there is no judgment..

  74. Perfectionism is like a prison, an impossible aspiration where the bar is set forever higher and nothing is ever good enough. Perfectionism also feels cold, harsh and demanding – the forever raised finger and the perpetual expectation of being punished for something done. Perfectionism is a plague and a mental health hazard. Perfectionism also stops people from reaching their true potential.

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