Self-Worth, the Stars and the Universe…

What exactly do we mean when we say someone has low self-worth? Do we mean that they do not value themselves and their place in the world? That they place others as more important or worthy? And if we agree that this is so, does that imply that they do not feel they matter, or does it mean that there is something to fix, and once fixed, then the worth can kick in and the rewards that life can offer will be attained, or at least come within reach?

That has certainly been so in my case, and I can still have spells when all of a sudden my sense of worth plummets. I have a week when life is getting on top of me and I’m surrounded by reflections showing that I’m not up to scratch – the house has suddenly become messy, the sink clogged with unwashed dishes for a few days on end. Work feels tedious, people annoy me, or I feel like I’m not bringing as much value to my job as I could. I take less care with my grooming, I feel fat and like a frump, or I feel old and past it… the list can go on and on and the reasoning behind the self-critical talk can be ridiculous… just an excuse to bring myself down a peg, and then give-up and take solace in checking out by watching TV or overeating, or surfing the net and countless other distractions.

So where does this attitude of self-critique and sense of unworthiness come from? Are we born with it? Have we ever looked at a baby and thought, “My goodness, that child has self-worth issues!” I certainly have not. A baby lets us know exactly what they want in no uncertain terms, and doesn’t seem to ask “Am I worth it?” They innately know that it is not even a question that needs to be considered.

Can we therefore surmise that the sense of self-worth is with us at birth, and that lack of self-worth is learned? And that all learned behaviour serves a purpose, which we perceive makes it ‘easier’ to survive? As children we develop our awareness of the external world and learn what is acceptable to others and what is not. We learn the social norms and standards of our specific culture from the outside in and are rewarded for some achievements and behaviours and punished for others.

At the same time, the trust in our inner voice and promptings fades. Our self-worth becomes a measure of recognition from the external world. Most of us get caught up in this miasma to some degree. No parent is perfect and able to always understand what the child needs. Let’s be frank, as parents we muck up. We’re not always attentive and in-tune with ourselves, let alone with a child, and if there are siblings or a demanding partner involved, it can easily go off the rails at times.

As children grow and learn to negotiate life with others, we see different behaviours – no two children in the same family will respond in the same way to the same circumstances. One child may be naturally confident whilst their sibling nurses hurts (perceived or real) for a long time. They may try different ways of getting love and attention and feeling good about themselves in ways specific to them.

I remember at one time, when I was about nine or ten, deciding that I was going to change my attitude and become ‘acceptable.’ How I got to the point of feeling I was not good enough is another story, but suffice to say it was a combination of how I was in the family, the reactions and messages I received, and what I did with that information. At one time I chose to be super ‘good’ and ‘helpful’ because I’d taken on the beliefs that I was self-centred, unattractive, a bit nasty and in many ways, simply not good enough.

Growing up in the fifties I read a lot of books and watched movies where most of the heroines had virtuous qualities that I clearly lacked. So, looking for redemption, I attempted to re-shape myself in their image. I dutifully devoted myself to household tasks that I did not enjoy to get positive attention, and focussed on being helpful, a ‘good girl,’ loving sister, grateful, appreciative, uncomplaining etc.

It makes me cringe to write this down. Of course, it was a short-lived week or so of reshaping myself in that particular way. Although I was loving and caring by nature, I was trying to shape myself to an ideal, a goal external to me, to achieve a sense of inner settlement and worth in the eyes of others and, quite frankly, it was unsustainable and not coming from any inner feeling that flowed naturally. It was forced and against my rebellious grain.

But to be honest, the same pattern has played out in many different guises throughout my long life. As an adolescent trying to be attractive to boys in crazy stuff, like not farting in their presence, dieting to get as close as possible to the body image and shape presented at the time, being unobtrusive, interested, patient, undemanding… anything but real. Is it any wonder that being the real me felt like an unknown exotic foreign land, and life was extremely unsettling? I didn’t know what I needed to do to be acceptable, I just knew it had to be different.

The truth is that when I am feeling comfortable in my own skin, I do not question my value; I just get on with it. I look after myself. I make sure that I have enough sleep, that I have clean clothes that feel great to wear in my wardrobe, that my shoes are comfortable, that there is a selection of food in the pantry and fridge to sustain me, and I enjoy my work and my relationships with friends, colleagues, family and the general public. I do not hold back.

However, when faced with a challenge, the depth of self-worth is revealed. Do I back myself up or am I so timid that at the first hint of criticism I withdraw back into my shell? It takes courage to step out of comfort and risk expanding into a larger version of ourselves. Like a snake we must shed the skin that constricts and constrains our growth. Or a tadpole that must change form to evolve, or a caterpillar that builds a cocoon to midwife its emergence as the butterfly. We are constantly called to more.

There is also a deeper level of self-worth to be considered. We are not here to live mundane, safe, comfortable lives, but to constantly unfold into our ever-expanding potential. As humans we are not constrained by the limitations of species specific instincts, but hard-wired to attune ourselves to the innermost calling of our Soul that, in one form or another, forever beckons us to ask questions, to seek justice for all, equality, brotherhood.

The other night I stepped outside to drink in the beauty of the ‘heavenly firmament,’ the Milky Way constellation that we are blessed with in the Southern Hemisphere night sky. I felt held and inspired by the reflection of beauty, constancy, ancient timelessness, expansion and home that the night sky brings.

As I lay down to sleep, I literally had stars in my eyes and felt connected to the glory of the universe that we are all part of, because as science has presented, we are made of the same particles. We literally are all equal on the basic physical level. The stars just are and they shine because that is their nature; they do not hide one day because they do not feel good enough to shine. Sailors set course by the stars; ancient structures, such as the pyramids, measure the movements of the heavens, and the stars are a constant reminder that we are, in essence, forever part of the infinite, expanding and eternal grandness that is our universe. To be less because of so-called low self-worth issues is simply an excuse to not come out of hiding and comfort and shine forth.

We don’t describe people as having high self-worth, we see them as shining lights who are leading the way. People like Natalie Benhayon, whose love for humanity is so great that she simply and playfully shines a light on The Way, works tirelessly but joyfully to inspire all women and men to re-ignite their own fire, their true worth and to shine forth too.

By Anne Hart, BSocSc, Goonellabah

Related Reading:
I Am Amazing just for Being Me
Self-Esteem is No Longer an Issue – Appreciating, Celebrating and Loving My Body
A Sacred Relationship with Self – Inspired by Natalie Benhayon

466 thoughts on “Self-Worth, the Stars and the Universe…

  1. I can feel how when we appreciate all that we do in the flow of movement, this expands all that is great and diminishes all that is not us. We have so much support of the universe and the stars all around us when we ask for help, which brings us back to relying on our inner feeling again.

  2. Self-care certainly is a foundational step in one´s process of living and being the love that we are and as you say, the more we unfold on that path self-care needs to be refined and adjusted with every step along the way. As with everything regarding evolution, the principles remain consistent but the expression develops.

    1. Love is a pristine brilliance, as opposed to lack of self worth which is a tarnished implosion. Love is real and lack of self worth is part of the illusion. It is for us to be the love that we are.

  3. I love that you ask the question about babies having self-worth issues – it absolutely shows it is a learnt behaviour and one we should swiftly unlearn! Of equal inspiration is, of course, the stars who, regardless of what is reflected to them still shine brightly.

    1. Yes, lack of self-worth is a creation not something that is innate in us. How can we truly place value on something as precious as a child, or the stars…it is nonsense of our own making.

  4. ‘The truth is that when I am feeling comfortable in my own skin, I do not question my value; I just get on with it.’ Lovely Anne, when we are connected we know that we are already everything that we need.

  5. I know very well the cycle of lack of self worth and then the choice to numb that feeling with food and the inevitable self critical thoughts.

  6. I remember feeling quite in awe of stars at night when I was a child, I loved it when we had to travel late and I would get to see the night sky.

  7. “…inspired by the reflection of beauty, constancy, ancient timelessness, expansion and home that the night sky brings….” Yes, looking up at the night time sky has a re-callibrating ability to put things (stresses, concerns) into order, into perspective – reconnecting you to a sense of space and timelessness – to pull you up out of any clouded vision reconnecting you inwardly and expansion at the same time.

  8. ‘We don’t describe pepople has having high self-worth….’. Yet it is interesting to note that when this is noticed such people are sometimes described as being above themselves, or need taking down a peg or two. Or is this a peculiarly British trait? It is as if bringing people down to the lowest common denominator allows others to feel content with where they are at, i.e. not shining.

  9. “Like a snake we must shed the skin” ….. and step out of our comfort zone into new territory as our selfworth grows. Having inner confidence allows those who oppose our views and try to take us down, have less impact than previously, especially when we stand up for truth.

  10. I had a big realisation recently that I too often dismiss the power of my presence and cast myself aside believing that it doesn’t matter if I’m present or not. But it does matter a great deal. My presence is as important as anyone else’s, and to believe otherwise is a huge devaluing of myself.

    1. That is true. The moment we are ready to withstand the avalanche of criticism and jealousy we realise what you have described so beautifully, Rebecca.

  11. This is a gorgeous blog, bringing a truth that we all need to hear. It takes courage but we are meant to grow and shed our skin, letting ourselves not be small but the grandness that we are.

  12. “Have we ever looked at a baby and thought, “My goodness, that child has self-worth issues!” I certainly have not.” Ditto, its quite funny to even consider this yet why then do we have self worth issues as an adult when we have the ability to objectively look at life? Something else is going on yet nothing around us confirms that feeling we have as a baby so we end up going down a path that is the opposite of who we truly are. And opposite to what the stars shine on us.

  13. Low-self worth often seems a sophisticated strategy to me for a person to be less and to justify that way of being.

  14. ‘As I lay down to sleep, I literally had stars in my eyes and felt connected to the glory of the universe that we are all part of, because as science has presented, we are made of the same particles. ‘ – Very lovely Anne, I can feel the beautiful connection.

  15. When we get to know the thoughts you describe Anne, as energy first and stop entertaining the layers of ridicule, giving up and critique they supply, we’ll get to see that falling asleep with magnificence of the galaxy, talking with the warmth of the sun in your chest or walking with absolute love in each step is not a once in a lifetime experience for us but who we true are and what we deserve to live every day.

    1. Reading the energy of our thoughts is great wisdom Joseph thank you, as when we can catch the critical thoughts it is a moment to look at ‘where was i to allow this bully in?’ The stars and the sun and the space all around us show us that we are much grander than the limiting thoughts, and that we are deserving of love and respect.

  16. I observe my children and children around us and I have not doubt that we are all born feeling like we are enough, children live, respond and enjoy life without questioning themselves. I know that my issues with self worth developed as I grew up…they are healing, but I know I am not alone when it comes to this issue. So what is that saying about how we parent and raise our children society?

  17. What is beautifully raised here is the idea that our appreciation for our divine nature can be an ever deepening process.

    1. So true Heather – I love gazing at the stars as it makes me feel so small and humble yet so grand and powerful all at the same time!

  18. When we stand in our essence, there is no criticism. When we step outside of our essence then there is a free reign on any negativity and criticism. So the question is do we come from our essence or not?

  19. Low self worth just like self doubt is a crippling comfort that keeps us in the delay of ever having to step up and take full responsibility for ourselves.

  20. Great insight: we naturally have self worth, only lack of self-worth is learned. We are stars, and just like stars don’t have any self-worth or shining problems it is our innate nature to shine. So nothing to work on, only to let go of some layers that cover that light.

  21. As we are light, we are made to shine just like the stars, and no star shines any less on any one night, or holds back in any way. Young children are definitely proof that we started off enthusiastic in our shiny-ness but then realised if we wanted to fit in we had to dim our light and tone ourselves down. Thankfully, all we need to do is reconnect and we are back as shiny as ever.

  22. When we begin to realise the majesty of the Universe and the reflection it offers we can connect to the glory and wonder that we also hold within. Beginning that connection with oneself allows the space to gradually let go of the layers that have eroded our natural sense of worth and our part in the world.

  23. There is a huge difference in looking to see what my needs, my preferences and my expectations are, to observing what is required to support myself and the whole equally. One seems to encourage me to become more and more insular, dissatisfied and controlling, while the latter inspires an open, inquisitive and expansive relationship with life in which love, responsibility and empowerment is assured.

  24. Beholding the milky way full of stars and wonderment never fails to remind me that we are part of a whole magical universe.

  25. The universe and the stars and that fact that we are all part of this is so beautiful and magnificent to realise and appreciate with a responsibility to shine brightly also as we all made of the same particles.I love this sharing and the understanding of lack of self worth and the claiming of our essence shining out from within .

  26. “Can we therefore surmise that the sense of self-worth is with us at birth, and that lack of self-worth is learned?” very few people grow up knowing what appreciation truly is and therefore, everything else we experience reflects the ‘lack of ‘ and not being enough and so we grow up trying to fill the void of that which we have disconnected from and is a natural way of being.

    1. True – living with appreciation and confirming all that we are leaves no room whatsoever for self-doubt let alone self-critique and living to another tune.

  27. ‘Self-worth, the Stars and the Universe’ . . . ah I feel a song coming on! Oh it’s already been written “you bring the Light of the Universe, So precious you are, Love Divine’. Track one ‘Sounds of Soul’ [https://www.soundsofsoul.com.au]

  28. “We don’t describe people as having high self-worth, we see them as shining lights who are leading the way.” Such a great point Anne. It is a bit crazy how we put so much emphasis on the negative aspects of ourselves, whatever that maybe, but we rarely celebrate the positive aspects and attributes of ourselves or each other unless there has been an achievement. Its surley time something changed in this respect.

  29. “dieting to get as close as possible to the body image and shape presented at the time, being unobtrusive, interested, patient, undemanding… anything but real” – We often complain that the world is getting crazier every day, and that our current generation is tolerating extraordinary levels of abuse, corruption and irresponsibility even with incredible technological advancements etc.. But, if this is something going on under the surface for many people; the lack of any realness to the way we live in order to come across a certain way, then no wonder this distortedness is amplified in our relationships and in society.

  30. ‘Growing up in the fifties I read a lot of books and watched movies where most of the heroines had virtuous qualities that I clearly lacked’. Yes Anne, this is one of the prime places where we accessed our role models. With me it was mainly books. I remember heroines like ‘George’ (Georgina) in The Famous Five, who was like a boy, acted like a boy, and was rebellious. I remember another heroine who could row boats across choppy lakes in a very ‘plucky’ way and was celebrated for her heroism in this field. Certainly in English books the heroines were praised for their boy-like qualities, while in American Movies of the fifties they were championed for their wonderfully homey/household roles (which didn’t appeal to me at all) or the sexy/destructive roles (which were bruised). I am afraid that I fell for Sandra Dee, an innocent who was extremely cute looking, and somehow managed to have slightly rebellious qualities without offending anyone!

  31. “… Can we therefore surmise that the sense of self-worth is with us at birth, and that lack of self-worth is learned? …” A great question, giving insight to just how much energetic interference there can be to prohibit a person remaining with that true sense of themselves.

  32. I love how you bring us back to the shining stars that we are and the simpleness in that there is no reason to not be who we are.

  33. It seem to me that we ‘stuff up’ when it comes to raising children, that we are given something very precious and totally complete and by the time they get to say 10 and it could be younger we have squashed their preciousness and got them to conform to what we think society expects and we do this because we want them to be tough enough to cope with life. But what if we have this way of parenting all wrong? And lets face it when we look around and see the mess we are all in, surely we have to question our current way of parenting and be honest enough to say its not working and it has never worked.

  34. I too can’t imagine anyone ever looking at a baby and saying “My goodness, that child has self-worth issues!” So, what happens between our issue free introduction to the world and the issue filled life we often we live as adults? From my life experience I can see that the world isn’t set up to support young children to retain the beautiful way of being that they are born with, but just imagine a world in which this was the normal thing to do!

  35. A great offering and pertinent questions to ask of ourselves… do we back ourselves and do we shine our natural true essence without dulling down our glory?

  36. We are called to constantly be more, in my experience that ‘more’ doesn’t come from outside of me like we ‘learn more’ at school. It’s actually asking that I stay connected to myself more, longer, deeper, in different areas of life.

      1. And when I look at it in this way it’s not that connection gets harder or requires more effort but about remaining with myself and then that more comes out as thats what it is designed to do and be.

  37. A very inspiring article , thank you Anne – I just love.. ‘As I lay down to sleep, I literally had stars in my eyes and felt connected to the glory of the universe that we are all part of, because as science has presented, we are made of the same particles.’

  38. Love the simple honesty where i’m sure this would resonate for the majority of us in how do we actually value ourselves as we are? As you powerfully stated if we live..’anything but real.’ It is living the anything but real that we loose our sense of value and or self worth as we make a decision somewhere along the line that if i am this or than i will ‘get’ from out there, the love, recognition, acceptance. approval or whatever it may be. It’s like who I am just does not cut it in life. BUT if we give it to ourselves what we want from out there, such as love, beginning to value ourselves intrinsically, then life begins to change

    As

    ‘The stars just are and they shine because that is their nature; they do not hide one day because they do not feel good enough to shine’

  39. ‘To be less because of so-called low self-worth issues is simply an excuse to not come out of hiding and comfort and shine forth.’ This is such a powerful blog – so exposing and uplifting at one and the same time. Beautifully written, thank you so much Anne Heart.

  40. Imagin if a caterpillar refused to become a crysalys it’s ludicrous right ! Yet that’s what we do we want to stay the same, for things to not change. We need to look to nature for our inspiration. It’s is more than evident that the flow of magnificent is normal.

  41. When we get caught up in the details and the hoop jumping of physical life, we reduce ourselves to human beings, where as, if and when we can allow ourselves to feel the grander picture of things, then we can also feel that we are far greater than the human being itself, that there is a connection to dimensions beyond what we can see, dimensions that we are reminded of through the stars. This goes well beyond any spiritual aspect, but goes right to the core – the Soul and the Universe itself.

  42. This resonates wth me, feeling connected to the universe, my life is no longer limited to my life within the walls of my home or work, I know that I live in a universe and on a planet that is spinning around the sun, with beautiful starlight shining on us. We limit ourselves with ideas, of family, borders, nationalism, gender, locations etc, we can break these patterns by building a connection with our bodies, the gateway to the universe…self-care is the key to this exploration.

  43. ‘We don’t describe people as having high self-worth, we see them as shining lights who are leading the way’. And boy, do we need those shinning lights so that we all get the reflection that we can shine our light too and be accepted!

  44. At the age of 50 I am returning to have a relationship with the world, nature and the universe that is full of the wonderment of a child… and much of the awe of this is realising that we are all part of all this.

  45. “The truth is that when I am feeling comfortable in my own skin, I do not question my value; I just get on with it.” Beautiful when we are connected we simply know and shine our light lovingly and when we are not self doubt raises its ugly head and takes over if we let it. Just look at the stars and the universe and all can be seen in its glory.

  46. ‘The truth is that when I am feeling comfortable in my own skin, I do not question my value; I just get on with it.’ – How profound this claiming is, and simply an amazing confirmation that you know perfectly well who you are, and by that, are able to honour and deeply appreciate what you bring.

  47. This is a pearl of wisdom Anne – everyone matters and the more each one of us knows that and values our own magnificence, power and love, saying an absolute ‘NO” to the lack of self-worth game that has us spiralling down into the pit you so well described, the more humanity will be lifted and strengthened. We will be able to heal the cess-pool of misery ad disease that we misguidedly revel in.

  48. Very true. When faced with challenges we get to come face to face also with our self-worth. We can stand by ourselves, speak up about what we feel, or we can be intimidated by life and people and feel knocked down.

  49. This ‘self-worth’ world can seem like a jungle we are eternally stuck in, with endless paths, patches, hollows and heaps of creeping vine. Once stuck in there we seek a way out by pushing ahead and attempting to slash at what’s in our way. But what your words say to me Anne is that ‘self-worth’ is actually more of a fog that descends from time to time and masks our true vision of the world. Whatever landscape we see when we are in its midst of this mist doesn’t matter – it’s all a big illusion and lie. We don’t need to solve or go into the complex weeds of the issues, but see right through the dark clouds.

  50. ‘The stars just are and they shine because that is their nature; they do not hide one day because they do not feel good enough to shine.’- Ha! How true is this, our true nature is to never dull our light no matter what situation we may find ourselves in.

  51. You’re right Anne – no one is born with lack of self-worth… So could we say that it is a choice? Do we choose to lack in our own self-worth and do we get something out of it?

    1. Very pertinent point Rachael. The human spirit indeed gets a lot out of identifying with lack of self-worth. This stand in life is not only a protective device which spectacularly backfires and opens us to even more peril, but it is also a very effective mechanism to keep us out of the magnificent power and beauty that is our birth-right. Lack of self-worth has nothing to do with us! It is simply an identification of the human spirit to keep itself individuated and separate from the Soul.

  52. Re-Building my sense of self worth came when I began to appreciate my qualities and my expression; knowing that along side everyone else’s unique expression, mine was also unique too and therefore worth valuing.

  53. ‘The other night I stepped outside to drink in the beauty of the ‘heavenly firmament,’ the Milky Way constellation that we are blessed with in the Southern Hemisphere night sky. I felt held and inspired by the reflection of beauty, constancy, ancient timelessness, expansion and home that the night sky brings’. This is such a lovely thing to do Anne. To look up into the night sky is so nourishing for every aspect of our being. Feeling the beauty and authority of the star and knowing that they emanate within us is a real tonic. We feel humbled and yet full of value and worth. True Medicine.

    1. I love to do this regularly also Lyndy and I feel so refreshed and expanded whenever I do take a moment to observe the heavens constellations.

  54. The universe is constantly reflecting back to us the wondrous nature within ourselves, and once we connect to that we realize that, that is only the beginning as there is much more than we can imagine when we connect to and live from our soul and to be of true service for all.

  55. There is so much in here that I want to read it again and read every comment to see what other people also took from your blog. I appreciate that lack of self-worth is a learnt behaviour, that we are not born feeling less. I love the reflection that is there day in day out – consistently reflecting our grandness back to us as an inspiration to be that ourselves for others. I appreciate the reflections we have in people who choose that same level of dedication in their lives and yes, hats of to Natalie Benhayon who inspires by her lived way – not by a need to approval or recognition.

  56. At some level Anne, while not denying the images we bought into, I actually feel we had a better chance in life of connecting with equality and quality growing up in the fifties than we do now. I saw a photo recently at a presentation of a family in the fifties and I remembered so vividly a sense of purity and freshness that is very lacking in the jadedness of our present-day world.

  57. “does it mean that there is something to fix, and once fixed, then the worth can kick in and the rewards that life can offer will be attained, or at least come within reach?” This is a biggy for me as I often feel like there’s something that needs fixing within my life and within me. The first step towards a healthy self-worth is to know we all actually are capable of having one, it is within our reach because it is who we naturally are. It is a process of remembering rather than fixing.

  58. When we live in a way that does not put the being and body first, we can suffer from lack of self-worth from not feeling the truth of who we are. In other words, our body is always willing to show us that we are divinity through a physical form – when we resist we reduce ourselves and our feeling of worth.

  59. I recognize that one; that we create self worth issues to hide ourselves.
    I am wondering what happens if I stop this pattern in full? Have I the right to do so? is the question arising.
    Feels like I made a contract that I do not have the right.
    Time to let go some false beliefs that keep me in a repeating cycle until I move out.

  60. It’s beautiful the sense of simplicity that I get when reading where you describe how you feel and live when you do not question your worth – this is what I find with myself too – that beating myself up and undermining myself breeds complication and stress whereas when I allow myself to just innately value who I am then this makes life much simpler…

  61. Looking up at the stars at night at the vast firmament I feel so expanded and connected and I appreciate myself in a way that there is no question as to my self worth.

    1. This is beautifully said Elaine and brings us back to simplicity and purpose. As how could we not play a part in this entire universe when we are in it and part of it?

  62. I love this sentence: “However, when faced with a challenge, the depth of self-worth is revealed. Do I back myself up or am I so timid that at the first hint of criticism I withdraw back into my shell? ” It’s the difficult moments where we are asked to step up and back ourselves that call us to make the choice of how we want our lives to be – a life where we are constantly moving forward and embracing life or one where we are stepping backwards.

  63. Yes, I agree that lack of self worth is learned behaviour. We are not born with it, but it can take a while for us to let go of behaviours that have been ingrained from childhood. One loving step at a time.

  64. One point that really stood out in this blog was the fact that we never question our worth as a baby, we proudly and fully claim what we need, be that food, water or sleep. We do not hold back out of fear of upsetting our Mum. Lack of self worth is a story we run, in order to avoid shining. I love the reflection you offer us with this article and the eternal offering from the stars.

  65. The more we value ourselves the more we uncover the oodles of support, love and care we have around us and we see how our movements either propel us forward or hold us in struggle and tension. When we move with appreciation for who we are we begin to feel the purpose and quality of our movements and how this in turn then supports all.

  66. We spend our whole lives living up to pictures of our own creation, only to miss out on the fact that we are so much more. It seems such a waste that if we were to drop everything and come back to us, we would find that we had everything all along and that no amount of changing ourselves to fit in would ever bring us back to our true self. Talk about going around in circles.

  67. ‘We don’t describe people as having high self-worth, we see them as shining lights who are leading the way. People like Natalie Benhayon, whose love for humanity is so great that she simply and playfully shines a light on The Way, works tirelessly but joyfully to inspire all women and men to re-ignite their own fire, their true worth and to shine forth too.’ Beautifully said Anne. The dogged hanging on to lack of self-worth and self-loathing is ridiculous when you connect to the innermost and realise that we are Sons of God. The creation of suffering is the biggest trick on earth – it has absolutely no substance.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s