The Path to True Wellness – it’s a Loving Choice

 by Amanda Woodmansey, Melbourne, Australia

I can remember feeling unwell all of my life, and when I was old enough, searching for answers to my physical and mental anguish. I had followed a religion as faithfully as I could, believing at the time that it was my shortcomings that were the cause of my woes, and not the impossible quest to be good within an extremely misogynous organisation.

I did everything; joined charity groups, practised yoga, married, had kids, built a house, worked, made peace between family members, kept quiet, went to the doctors, was part of a wide community, was very exhausted and extremely depressed. My doctor prescribed anti-depressants and visits to a psychologist, and I worked on all sorts of strategies suggested by them. When I was 28, I discovered the amazing lightness of not eating dairy or gluten and many of my ills went away, but not the depression or exhaustion. I gave up searching for answers for wellness, and discovered that alcohol made everything feel fine. My friends had all found the same path to happiness and everything went along nicely at socially acceptable levels. I had no obvious terrible traumas. My husband and family were lovely. My childhood had been happy.

The women around me practised the impossible notion of being all things to all people and I joined them. In fact, I had been trained to join them all my life.

In 2002 my family moved to Byron Bay and had a lovely time. I went back on anti-depressants, and when I wasn’t on those I was drinking alcohol. I had a market stall and studied Visual Arts at university. I was the best managed version of myself.

In 2005 I was introduced to Serge Benhayon. All of the things he said made sense, and so much had already been my experience. I had just never trusted that my own experience and my own body were messages for me. In a way I was annoyed to hear someone who made it clear that personal responsibility was the key to good health. I had been counting on genetics after measuring the odds and looking at relatives who had lived recklessly and had appeared to get away with it.

Serge speaks of harmony in the body. He speaks of having found the way to live in a true livingness that belongs to all of us and is found within all of us. He speaks of personal responsibility and of loving ourselves. He speaks of the joy that is possible and constant if we let it into our lives. He teaches that all is energy and so, all is because of energy. Serge also lives exactly what he teaches and so do his family, and he is inspirational in his way of life.

After years of the absence of love in the way I treated myself, the full realisation of where I had led myself was obvious and hard to take. It would be a great fantasy to think that someone else could take it all away, but that is not the case, and Serge has explained that quite clearly. I realised how much I needed to change my life and how far my ‘idea of well’ had strayed from true wellness.

In 2007 I discovered I had thyroid cancer with some complications which recurred in 2008. I was able to clearly see the path that led to that, and I was also able to take an active role in my own healing. I was operated on several times and underwent radiation treatment twice. At no stage was it ever suggested by Serge or the team at Universal Medicine that I should not do as medical science suggested in the treatment of this disease. Serge and the practitioners at Universal Medicine were extremely supportive throughout that time and beyond, and I chose to have healing sessions with them to support my healing at the same time as following the course of action prescribed by the medical specialists. It also certainly improved my prospects to have been living a much healthier, alcohol and drug free life for the two years before this event.

Not at any stage in the courses and talks or in private sessions, have I heard the claim that Serge or Universal Medicine offers a cure for cancer and I did not expect one. What I found was the support to change my life in all the loving ways needed, with the support of people who had themselves changed their lives, to live with the greatest integrity.

It was also fortunate that my partner of 32 years was in tune with the truth of the way of living that we had found through the inspiration of Serge and his family. Our relationship was so enriched by the true love, joy and playfulness we found in ourselves.

We are all free to choose our own way of life and sometimes this causes upheavals. The important thing is to make a choice.

It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones. Perhaps there is less challenge to the way we are living when we see lousy choices in those around us.

Serge Benhayon has shown us that joy and love are possible without compromise. He’s shown us that these things are possible within a busy working and family life. We can choose to live the way we are naturally made to live in this modern world, and when we choose love it gives those around us the opportunity to see that perhaps there is another way.

Recently my partner and I moved back to Melbourne to be closer to our families. If we were part of a cult, this would not be possible. We still live with the joy we have within us. We live as part of the world and not separate from it. There is no perfection and we face challenges every day, but the difference is that we deal with stuff as it happens and we don’t numb ourselves or check out.

I am far more gentle with myself and don’t beat myself with recriminations. I do not suffer depression ever, and am sometimes tired but never exhausted. There is a joy in my life and a willingness to allow others to choose their own way.

I am very grateful to Serge Benhayon for inspiring me to trust my own feelings and for encouraging my voice to be heard.

182 thoughts on “The Path to True Wellness – it’s a Loving Choice

  1. Thank you Amanda, the title for your blog sums it up for me. When we take responsibility for ourselves this can bring up reactions in others because they have not made similar self-loving choices for themselves. It is very inspiring though for many to reflect a more loving way to live.

    1. Agreed Linda – this was the biggest thing for me to discover – not only that I ‘had’ a choice but that I was responsible for my choices (& not a victim as I had made myself out to be) – what a game (or should I say ‘life’ !) changer!

      1. There is definitely a game playing out when we choose to be the victim leaving us in a rut and “thinking’ this is the only way to be. Discovering that we are the game changes and leaders brings out a whole new perspective about life and how we choose to live it.

  2. To look at ones choices, to accept that we are not perfect and will make mistakes, choosing to be gentle not condemning when we do make mistakes and addressing situations and feelings that are disturbing are all very real and tangible choices that lead to a vitality and form of true wellness. It may sound all too much but there are hundreds (and growing) cases of where from one man showing that it can be done the student body has also been able to do and expand and grow upon. Each an example that shows that regardless of our previous choices and relationship and connection with the love that we are, with others, the ‘self’ we create, the world, the universe (basically everything) we can always choose to go back and re-choose in and from that love that we are.

    1. I love that we can go back and re-choose when we make a mistake, without beating ourselves up about ‘being wrong’

    2. Absolutely Leigh Matson, “we can always choose to go back and re-choose in and from that love that we are.” I agree it is inspirational to observe and so know that it can also be true for ourselves, we can choose love, no more hanging on to problems, issues and identities, there is a freedom in making choices, and in any moment we can choose love. Serge Benhayon has been sharing his path of return and now many others are also walking their path of return, to their true essence and divinity.

  3. Amanda, your experiences here are something we can all relate to I am sure. Taking responsibility and that is true responsibility for our actions is not always easy the face of all the times we have so clearly chosen to not make those same choices. It is my own experience and clearly yours as well that choosing to heal and take these steps of truth and love are well worth every moment even if at first it may seem a bit challenging.

  4. It IS most definitely trusting our feelings, that leads us to a truer way of life. I love what you’ve shared about the support you’ve received from Universal Medicine during illness. The practitioners and Serge Benhayon NEVER judge, tell one what to do or condemn you for getting sick. Yes we need to take responsibility for our choices and the part we have had in any illness, but all along if we chose to ask for support from Universal Medicine, we receive it in spades and with a strong dose of Truth and Love.

    1. The fact that no judgment is expressed by Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine practitioners is gold, it is so supportive to feel it. It allows space for us to know that we are not our issues and dramas and that underneath them remains something unbroken, full of light and love, our soul. This has been my experience.

  5. “What I found was the support to change my life in all the loving ways needed, with the support of people who had themselves changed their lives, to live with the greatest integrity.” This is exactly what Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine present to us. Responsibility for our own choices ultimately supports us in a true healing and opens our awareness to a deeper level of self; the innate love and joy within.

  6. ” What I found was the support to change my life in all the loving ways needed, with the support of people who had themselves changed their lives, to live with the greatest integrity.” I too have found this in Universal Medicine – the support of true family, as have many of us – finding our way back to true wellness through our loving choices.

    1. This is lovely sueq2012, ‘the support of true family’ I have felt this in my experience of Universal Medicine, the presentations and the student body that has grown around it. It has and is inspirational to observe those choosing to express with love in their lives.

  7. “He’s shown us that these things are possible within a busy working and family life. We can choose to live the way we are naturally made to live in this modern world, and when we choose love it gives those around us the opportunity to see that perhaps there is another way.” So true Amanda. Serge Benhayon is an inspiration to all of us to live with love and it is our responsibility and pleasure to share this way of living as an inspiration to others.

  8. Very true that there’s a bafflingly disproportionate level of brouhaha about a way of living that is more gentle, simple and life-enhancing than there is about the modern day plagues befalling humanity today of our own making – obesity, diabetes, cancers, heart disease to name but four. Seriously, are we so arrogant that we’ll pooh-pooh something that clearly works with the body – and in full support of any conventional medicine too – in favour of truly confronting our own irresponsibility for the relationship we’ve been running with our bodies?

  9. Yep it’s crazy to think that there are so many objections to living responsibly and present to living recklessly, I tried the latter for ages and no one would say a word, change that and it’s like adding fuel to the fire …

  10. Taking true responsibility for our own wellness “We can choose to live the way we are naturally made to live in this modern world, and when we choose love it gives those around us the opportunity to see that perhaps there is another way.” Amanda this is so true, when we are connected to ourselves and live from that inner knowing it is a joy to be living, and a great reflection for others to see that there is a different way to live.

  11. Relying on alcohol for simulation, numbing and to fit in with society is accepted by many as ‘normal’. I used to drink frequently and many of my friends did around me “I gave up searching for answers for wellness, and discovered that alcohol made everything feel fine.” We all condoned it and made it ‘normal’ there where moments in my life when I did have a ‘personal’ thought that perhaps this wasn’t quite right but I continued for over 10 years of my adult life, drinking ‘socially’ and working, as many do. The monotonous of it began to impact on me, I kept feeling there was more to life, and I can safely say there is…I have changed many of my behaviours and patterns that many ‘think’ are ‘normal’ to a new ‘normal, one that supports my body. Alcohol has been let go of and I no longer feel the need to make excuses for myself socially, this is how strong this issue is embedded in our society, for more than 5 years after deciding not to drink the opinions about why I did not and how it was strange, impacted on me. My choice of course, but it really indicates the pressure that many face when beginning to make choices to self-care.

    1. “I kept feeling there was more to life, and I can safely say there is…”, I love how you say that with your authority, Samantha! It really resonates.

  12. Beautiful quote “I realised how much I needed to change my life and how far my ‘idea of well’ had strayed from true wellness.” So true. What is true health? – society has a version of wellness that is a shadow of our true potential.

  13. ‘There is a joy in my life and a willingness to allow others to choose their own way.’ Amanda, the surrender and acceptance you are living with stands out through these words. It is not always easy to allow another their choices yet it is one of the most beautiful and harmonious ways we could be in our relationships and offers a holding of another in love.

  14. I can relate to what you have written Amanda and your expression is much appreciated, The Ageless Wisdom really does work as many of us have displayed

  15. When we take an honest and active role in our own healing process just as you did Amanda and embrace the wisdom of both conventional medicine and true complementary medicine we become far more open to why we became ill in the first place and this understanding allows the pathway to true healing and true wellbeing.

  16. ‘It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones. Perhaps there is less challenge to the way we are living when we see lousy choices in those around us.’ Beautifully put and completely exposing the lack of personal responsibility for our own choices that lies beneath many an objection, where the objection itself is only made to avoid the truth of the reflection on offer.

  17. What a difference it makes when we gently take responsibility for every aspect of our lives. The most challenging thing in doing this is that it goes against the grain of the set up in place, whereby illness isn’t seen to be anything more than bad luck and genetics. Yet we normalise behaviours that make illness almost inevitable. It is remarkable as Amanda states how much can be changed just through the removal of dairy and gluten from the diet. It is such a great starting point for addressing ill health and allows for a platform to build true wellness if the willingness is there to deeply look at how we live.

  18. I love what you have shared Amanda – our only true path is led by the love inside us – every loving choice a step closer to revealing the depth of us. It is our responsibility to know this depth, to know that there is so much more to us than we could ever have imagined. Healing yourself of cancer is massive and it’s really beautiful to read how you achieved that.

  19. As I read this blog I could feel the simplicity of the truth that comes from within us – when we choose to look for it there. I had experiences of depression too, then I got on with the desperate search for a solution and I did seem to feel better when I was working towards that solution. But nothing allowed me to feel the fullness of the truth that we already have and are within that I have experienced through the teachings and presentations of Serge Benhayon. Through his own connection to the Love that he is and lives, others are offered the opportunity to choose to reconnect to the love they are and the fullness of their true beingness. It is incredibly simple and a very beautiful way to be.

  20. ‘It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones’. I agree with this. No one ever questioned my dietary choices when I was eating…overeating…all the popular, fatty, sugary, processed foods and drinking alcohol regularly. But when I started to change I got quizzed about it. ‘Why don’t you drink?’ was a common theme as if not drinking is a reason for being suspicious of someone. ‘Why do you drink?’ I’d like to ask them – but at present, it is normal to do so and hence this seems to make it acceptable and ok. I feel very much more ‘alive’ and present in life having chosen not to drink alcohol, and drop other things from my diet that didn’t feel good to my body. My body was, and is, a great marker of what truly serves us in terms of our diet for it always gives us honest feedback…like hangovers.

  21. If as children we were encouraged to make self loving choices I am sure that the health of the world would be in a much more robust state than it is at present, there would be no long hospital waiting lists and the medical system would not be currently overwhelmed by the developing tsunami of diabetes cases. And to think this could all come from the choice to teach children to take responsibility for their precious bodies.

  22. Thankyou Amanda for sharing your story. I loved this line “Serge Benhayon has shown us that joy and love are possible without compromise.” This is so very true and something that inspires me everyday, as does the reflection of Natalie Benhayon and how she lives as a woman in this world, without any compromise of herself.

  23. It continues to amaze me that often when you make the loving decision to begin to look after yourself, removing food and substances from your diet that are harmful to your body, going to bed earlier, etc that the reaction from those around you is very negative and critical. As you say Amanda, perhaps it is because in seeing you making these self loving choices they may have to look at the choices that they are making and realise it is time to make a few different choices of their own, and that’s not a choice they are ready to make.

  24. It certainly is a loving choice Amanda and I am inspired by you and the loving choices you make. I love the truth of what you have expressed here;
    “We can choose to live the way we are naturally made to live in this modern world, and when we choose love it gives those around us the opportunity to see that perhaps there is another way.”

  25. Amanda, I love the way you have written this, you have shared such a positive yet simple message, that we are in control of our own lives and health and it isn’t random – even when we think we might be getting away with things ultimately our bodies tell the story. In regards to Serge Benhayon, he shares a simple message but one that gets ignored in favour of a juicy headline on reincarnation or curing cancer. It is a wonder why the simple message that we can change our health outcomes by listening to our bodies and living with respect for ourselves and all those we are in relationship with (everyone) is so hard for so many to hear. Is it the responsibility of knowing we are creating everything we experience that is hardest to bear.

  26. Thank you Amanda for sharing your story, I love this line “I am far more gentle with myself and don’t beat myself with recriminations. ” this is such a common practise the self bashing, I have often gone into my head to berrate myself for not getting it right, it is beautiful to come to understand that mistakes are there for our learning, and then we can accept what has been shown with gentleness and love for we are not perfect beings.

  27. You bring up something that is a bit of a blush moment for humanity and that is that we tend to not be very reflective of the way we live our lives and then when we get an illness or disease we do not really connect the two. Sometimes there is almost an outrage when it is suggested that we are the cause of the illnesses and diseases that appear in our bodies. I’m not sure why there is such a resistance here, maybe it’s us not being willing to be responsible for the way we live and maybe we are a bit ashamed that we are not living as fully as we could hence the need for the body to give us a reminder that it’s not being used to its full potential. Either way looking away will not make the ill go away.

  28. I love that you have exposed that true happiness does not lie in living the best managed version of ourselves but rather one where we choose personal responsibility and a loving way of being with ourselves and others… connecting us to the joy that is possible through our choices.

  29. There is a pattern here. Previous to Universal Medicine, adding things to our lives is the way to go to function and ‘be happy’. Post Universal Medicine is about discarding and refining based upon what truly works for you and your evolution and what does not.

  30. By living our lives making loving choices, to the best of our ability, and being responsible for our own health, our bodies and life situations, we are redefining what ‘well’ is.

  31. “It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones. Perhaps there is less challenge to the way we are living when we see lousy choices in those around us”. I too have noticed this. It happens a lot when I am with people who eat cake and I don’t. Somehow it makes people very uncomfortable to have someone not eating cake. Recently one of my colleagues said to me ” can you please eat some cake because then I will feel better”. How revealing is that!

  32. It’s a great observation that there seem to be ‘more objections to choosing a gentle, healthy way of life’ than many of the more self-neglectful or even self-harming ones. I have found this to be true – for example with my choice to not drink alcohol any more. People sometimes ask me ‘why don’t you drink?’ but doesn’t it make more sense to ask those who do drink ‘why do you drink alcohol?’ when we know it is a poison? There is something worth considering deeply here. Why do we raise more objections when another makes such a self-loving choice, than when someone simply follows the crowd in less than loving ways?

    1. You ask such a great question here Richard and as one who has also given up drinking alcohol I have also asked the question many times. Why is it that when you stop so many of those around you cannot handle it, and often do anything they can to get you to have a drink – just one? Initially I got quite cross with this reaction but eventually I came to understand that me not drinking was simply reflecting back to them that perhaps this was something that they needed to do too, but the thought of going there was just way too hard; that I totally understood and once I did being around those drinking alcohol was way easier and I felt no judgement at all.

  33. We can choose to look at those around us and at even ourselves who are living ‘recklessly’ and in disregard of their body and think that we are all appearing to get away with it. But in our hearts do we really feel this is true?

  34. “All of the things he [Serge Benhayon] said made sense, and so much had already been my experience. I had just never trusted that my own experience and my own body were messages for me”. One of the greatest crimes in life is that we learn to dismiss or override what our body presents to us. We learn that if it doesn’t come from a scientific source, an expert or a book it can’t be true. Knowing that our body does know is so freeing and empowering.

  35. I feel what Serge Benhayon presents is a model of simplicity – we are all equal Sons of God, and we are responsible for ourselves to live the love we naturally are, and it all boils down to the quality of choices we make everyday.

  36. It’s funny isn’t it that sometimes you find yourself defending what is actually the very best for you and your body yet you are criticised for it. But that only comes from those that resist the reflection they’ve been given even though that is the reflection they are dearly asking for. A bit of a dichotomy there behavioural wise but one that we can be understanding of. So when someone says you’re wrong for making loving decisions and choices see it as a token that you’re on the right and true way.

  37. “I had just never trusted that my own experience and my own body were messages for me.” This is big. We lead a life not trusting ourselves.. but what are we choosing to listen to and trust? If we listen to our mind’s thoughts I find as you clearly pointed out Amanda all looks to be fine and dandy when in fact and in body there is another message.
    You might of read about this in the Bible, or book, or maybe someone has said so however, if we truly listen we will hear what our body tells – the truth.

  38. “The important thing is to make a choice.” Wise words. It’s important to define that there is a choice. If we are not choosing what health, wellbeing and vitality we want in our life we automatically choosing a lesser version of health.

  39. “In a way I was annoyed to hear someone who made it clear that personal responsibility was the key to good health. I had been counting on genetics after measuring the odds and looking at relatives who had lived recklessly and had appeared to get away with it.” I know that one. It’s so tempting to pass the buck and blame genetics for where we find ourselves in life in relation to our health – both physical and mental. But in that lack of willingness to take responsibility for our own lives we are also throwing away the key to healing ourselves, for we are the custodians of the most powerful medicine we can take – our daily choices and how we live.

  40. Like you Amanda, when I came to realise that where I was in my life was a result of all the choices I had ever made, “the full realisation of where I had led myself was obvious and hard to take”. But although it was hard to accept in the beginning there was a part of me that I began to connect to that did not want me to beat myself up, but simply take hold, with both hands, the amazing opportunity I was being presented to change my live, and change it did. The day I met Serge Benhayon was undeniably the day I finally stepped, with every part of me, onto the path to “true wellness”.

  41. I don’t think there is any coincidence that you considered your shortcomings to be the cause of your woes. I don’t think any major religion puts its hand up and admits that it instils in us a feeling of not being good enough, being a sinner, guilt or failure. Wouldn’t it be liberating to realise that the religions themselves are flawed and in following their doctrines there is no way you can succeed. It is only through the body connection to the soul that we can know God and this has been hidden from us for too long.

  42. I also found it quite humbling to realise the lack of love in the way I had lived and treated myself. Possibly the hardest part of all to swallow is the ideals, ‘shoulds’ and beliefs we have bought into, to make up for the lack of love. In no way do these crumbs make up for having real love and care for yourself, as they always keep you wanting, and needing to do more.

  43. “We are all free to choose our own way of life and sometimes this causes upheavals. The important thing is to make a choice.” Only when we start to listen to our inner voice and then go forth accordingly can we find out what truth is for us and deepen it with every step more.

  44. ‘It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones. ‘ Very true Amanda, it’s crazy how making unloving choices has become ‘normal’ in society and when we begin to make loving choices people feel exposed in their unloving ways even when you are not judging them in anyway – what a powerful reflection to offer others.

  45. “Serge also lives exactly what he teaches and so do his family, and he is inspirational in his way of life.” Serge Benhayon offers the inspiration of a way of livingness that brings us back to the true love of who we naturally are.

  46. “It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones.” Choosing to be self-loving appears to be the true rebel in this society, how ironic is weird?

  47. This made me smile as I recognised this old pattern, how common and harmful it is, ‘The women around me practised the impossible notion of being all things to all people and I joined them.’ Great to call it out.

  48. Thank you Amanda, people need to see this in the world, ‘ when we choose love it gives those around us the opportunity to see that perhaps there is another way.’

  49. “The women around me practised the impossible notion of being all things to all people and I joined them. In fact, I had been trained to join them all my life.” I could really relate to this, I too had women all around me growing up, not just women in my immediate family, who all championed working hard, having it all, career, family, perfect house, clean, tidy and go on holidays 3 times a year. If you had all of that, then you were ‘happy’. It wasn’t about connection, support or feelings. This left an incredible hole and always left me feeling like there was something wrong with me. That is no longer the case, I understand that we are always whole and that we have everything inside that we need – always, but I didn’t feel that when growing up.

  50. Reading from where you came to where you are now is incredible and commonly unheard of. Many people who suffer depression and exhaustion have this for the whole of their life but you changed this around with the support of Universal Medicine and the way of living they presented – truly amazing.

  51. Depression is born of a contraction within us when we make the choice to withhold the expression of the great love that we are. Medication can assist but what truly restores life back into an exhausted and depleted body is the willingness to commit to our life and our love.

  52. ‘I had just never trusted that my own experience and my own body were messages for me’ – this is so relatable. We are the expert, the authority of our own life and our body, the very thing we have been having a direct experience of since the moment we are born, yet somehow, we allow leeway for doubt, ignoring, disbelieving, overriding what is so obviously being communicated loud and clear.

    1. There must be some reason that we all arrogantly ignore every message that our bodies communicates to us. Surely this should be researched until we come to realise that as the ancient wisdom has been teaching us for eons, everything is energy first before it is matter. So what is happening energetically for us to arrogantly ignore all the gentle messages until we have to be sent a stop message?

  53. Yes the traditional world religions tell us that our shortcomings are the cause of all our woes, but actually aligning to a religion that is not based on absolute truth is in many aspects the cause of our woes.

  54. ‘It is interesting that there are more objections to one choosing a gentle, healthy way of life than there is when one makes all the worst ones.’ This is so true Amanda, no one is objecting to drunkenness and the horrible consequences of that lifestyle choice, however people get very rattled when you say you don’t drink and will try and persuade you to just have one. Its all back to front.

  55. Hi Amanda, I love this blog, I love your expression and your sense of humour particularly with . . . “In a way I was annoyed to hear someone who made it clear that personal responsibility was the key to good health. I had been counting on genetics after measuring the odds and looking at relatives who had lived recklessly and had appeared to get away with it.” . . .It is great to hear you are doing so well, that in itself is testimony to the changes we can make when we start to take responsibility for our own health and well being.

  56. Thanks Amanda, I can understand your realisation of where your choices had led you, this has also been hard for me to face at times but the flip side is the empowerment that comes from taking full responsibility for myself.

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